The Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) finalized its plans to authorize the cultivation of 3,200,000 grams of marijuana for research purposes next year -- a 30 percent increase from 2019’s quota.

For the first time in history, a congressional committee has approved a bill to end federal marijuana prohibition.

Tuesday’s state and local elections across the U.S. saw several gains for the marijuana reform movement, as well as some potential setbacks.

The Senate approved spending legislation on Thursday that extends a provision protecting medical marijuana states from federal interference.

Two Pennsylvania state senators introduced Senate Bill 350 in Harrisburg on Tuesday which would allow adults 21 and older to possess, cultivate and purchase cannabis from licensed retailers.

Former Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Commissioner Scott Gottlieb said on Monday that the federal government should regulate state marijuana programs.

Another group of senators is calling on the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to expediently implement regulations for CBD in order to protect consumers and free up the industry.

New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo (D) revealed on Wednesday that he will be meeting with governors from throughout the region next month to coordinate marijuana legalization plans.

If the measure passes, it will be the most significant action taken by Congress on marijuana reform in recent memory.

The most cannabis-friendly Congress in history is back from its August recess, and lawmakers are already making key moves to advance marijuana reform legislation.

The Republican chair of the Senate Banking Committee said on Thursday that his panel will hold a vote on legislation allowing banks to service state-legal marijuana businesses this year.

Once a politically dangerous subject, legal marijuana has become something of a de facto platform plank for the 2020 Democratic candidates.

Over 100,000 certified signatures have been submitted to the Secretary of State’s office in an effort to legalize marijuana.

President Donald Trump again said that his administration is allowing states to set their own marijuana policies.

Americans are twice as likely to say that alcohol is “very harmful” than say the same about marijuana, according to a survey released on Monday.